ARTIST STATEMENT

John Nichols III at Paris Université 8
John Nichols III at Paris Université 8

Often described by listeners as energetic, evocative, and rich with movement and form, my diverse work in the field of sound has also been characterized as soothing, meditative, and entrancing. My work suggests the autonomous development of sounds, independent from representations and narrative connections. Embracing harmony and counterpoint as well as field recordings and contemporary studio techniques, my work contributes to the sonic arts through computer technology and the liberation of composition from a coherent subject. However, as a strong advocate for interdisciplinary work, I feel it is important to open doors for new mediums of expression and innovative approaches to art. As such, as a collaborator, I create in the context of the work, freeing myself from the development of overly repetitive practices and refreshing my creativity in the process; as a solo artist, my work is spatial, encompassing, and physically entangled within the performance area.

The driving force of my works is to apply modern technology to capture, manipulate, and transform the sounds of the world toward the production of new music. Structured toward establishing audio-subjects within non-connotative contexts, my work takes under consideration the liberation of sound from composition, and a balanced approach toward representations and specific moments of abstraction. Specifically, by utilizing my “found template” technique, I create unlikely renditions of experiences within the world by building on an original sound source (a field recording, studio improvisation, etc.) with external sonic occurrences (new sounds). Eventually, by removing the found template, the representative cast–which retains the temporal pacing of the primary experience–is left in place. Owing to this formulation, my compositions frequently approach (and perhaps sometimes exceed) the complexity of timbre found in an orchestra; by exhibiting more than one simultaneous facade, as though multiple contrasting images have been overlapped, the numerous sonic strata remain distinct from each other. Techniques such as these allow for dramatic form to enter the realm of sound, thereby creating a multifaceted event for the listener.